New To Reefing

Dean Lovett

Member
Apr 11, 2015
377
146
Penrith
Once My Tank Has Finished Cycling Or Is Approaching The End....
So I'm about to head into week three of my cycling.

My tank is going well, ammonia low, and nitrite low and salt fine too.

As my tank begins to end cycling what should I do and/or add?
 

Azedenkae

Member
Jun 17, 2013
191
40
Hey mate!

Once all the parameters you are aiming to get to zero hit zero, or close enough, you need to check that your aquarium is able to return to that state after a reasonable amount of time after each feeding.

To do this, well, you need to 'pretend' that you are feeding your livestock by well, 'feeding' the tank that much food (a daily amount), and see if the parameters can lower to zero (or close enough) within 24 hours. If it can, then that means that your aquarium has undergone the initial cycle. If it can't, it means that further cycling is necessary.

Once you are done with the cycle, I'd recommend a big water change - as large as you can make it. Things may have built up during the cycle that you can't test for, so a big water change is just a safe practice. Give your tank some freshness.

And once that is done, test parameters again to make sure everything is in place. Then stock your aquarium.
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
Hey mate!

Once all the parameters you are aiming to get to zero hit zero, or close enough, you need to check that your aquarium is able to return to that state after a reasonable amount of time after each feeding.

To do this, well, you need to 'pretend' that you are feeding your livestock by well, 'feeding' the tank that much food (a daily amount), and see if the parameters can lower to zero (or close enough) within 24 hours. If it can, then that means that your aquarium has undergone the initial cycle. If it can't, it means that further cycling is necessary.

Once you are done with the cycle, I'd recommend a big water change - as large as you can make it. Things may have built up during the cycle that you can't test for, so a big water change is just a safe practice. Give your tank some freshness.

And once that is done, test parameters again to make sure everything is in place. Then stock your aquarium.
@Azedenkae - please mate can you stop pretending you know about marine aquariums.
I disagree with every statement above.
Please back your advice/ claims by posting photo evidence that you have maintained a marine aquarium and we can take you seriously.

Thanks mate
 

Azedenkae

Member
Jun 17, 2013
191
40
@Azedenkae - please mate can you stop pretending you know about marine aquariums.
I disagree with every statement above.
Please back your advice/ claims by posting photo evidence that you have maintained a marine aquarium and we can take you seriously.

Thanks mate
Okay how about this, do tell me exactly why you disagree with what I said? It's easy enough to say 'I disagree', but why do you disagree?

I'll collate evidence on my side, but would love to hear why you think I am wrong as well.
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
Okay how about this, do tell me exactly why you disagree with what I said? It's easy enough to say 'I disagree', but why do you disagree?

I'll collate evidence on my side, but would love to hear why you think I am wrong as well.
How about this - start a new thread - tag me and we can discuss this and other statements of advice you wish to share.

I have met you in person and think you are ok however something is not quite well in your mind mate.
 

Azedenkae

Member
Jun 17, 2013
191
40
Sure, let's do that. Hey, if I am wrong I'd like to know too. Just haven't been proven so.

@OP: Apologies for derailing your topic btw. XD
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
Alright, let's discuss
Once all the parameters you are aiming to get to zero hit zero, or close enough, you need to check that your aquarium is able to return to that state after a reasonable amount of time after each feeding.

To do this, well, you need to 'pretend' that you are feeding your livestock by well, 'feeding' the tank that much food (a daily amount), and see if the parameters can lower to zero (or close enough) within 24 hours. If it can, then that means that your aquarium has undergone the initial cycle. If it can't, it means that further cycling is necessary.
Who does this? I have never come across this method.
 

Dean Lovett

Member
Apr 11, 2015
377
146
Penrith
Hey all,

While I think healthy discussion and debate is a key to innovation, I'm not really looking for too much innovation at the moment. Lol. Just some pointers for the end of cycling!

So maybe, just for clarity sake, just some discussion about end of cycling would be great! Hahah! Thanks.

Hopefully soon enough I'll be able to contribute to debate soon enough. (Salt water debate anyway, I'm already geared up and prepared to debate fresh water topics [fresh water original here])

Thanks in advance! :)
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
Well, advice that @Azedenkae Is trying to suggest is go slowly. A small bio load is recommended for a new aquarium as each month goes by a little bit more can be added.
A population of bacteria that can sustain your feeding fish food to fish waste disposal will develop. Hence filtering the water of nitrates. As he mentioned these levels should approach zero each month.
A recommendation especially for newbies to reefing is to add no more than one fish per month. This gives the bacteria filtration time to catch up and develop so that a new tank or tank shock syndrome does not occur.
If you wish get a pair of clowns. But as mentioned no more than one fish per month.
Doing things slowly will prevent the outbreak of ICH.

Without picking apart his advice too much I recommend no more than a partial water change of say 20 percent at the end of your cycle.
As for the life of me I can't say that there would be anything left in the water that would do any harm , right?

The above is old school advice , the new more reliable way is to feed and grow your bacteria through carbon dosing and not via fish food.
We can leave it at that for now.
 

curly747

Member
Aug 13, 2013
168
57
Curl Curl
Hi Dean,
I don't think you need to change anything much. Just be as patient as you can. Maybe leave it a few more weeks if you can. After that buy a small fish or two that you love and want to keep forever. My first two clowns from couple of years back are still going strong so i am glad i like them.
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
So I'm about to head into week three of my cycling.

My tank is going well, ammonia low, and nitrite low and salt fine too.

As my tank begins to end cycling what should I do and/or add?
You need 0 ammonia
0 nitrite and less than 25ppm Nitrate and then , only then can you think of adding any livestock.
 

Dean Lovett

Member
Apr 11, 2015
377
146
Penrith
Well, advice that @Azedenkae Is trying to suggest is go slowly. A small bio load is recommended for a new aquarium as each month goes by a little bit more can be added.
A population of bacteria that can sustain your feeding fish food to fish waste disposal will develop. Hence filtering the water of nitrates. As he mentioned these levels should approach zero each month.
A recommendation especially for newbies to reefing is to add no more than one fish per month. This gives the bacteria filtration time to catch up and develop so that a new tank or tank shock syndrome does not occur.
If you wish get a pair of clowns. But as mentioned no more than one fish per month.
Doing things slowly will prevent the outbreak of ICH.

Without picking apart his advice too much I recommend no more than a partial water change of say 20 percent at the end of your cycle.
As for the life of me I can't say that there would be anything left in the water that would do any harm , right?

The above is old school advice , the new more reliable way is to feed and grow your bacteria through carbon dosing and not via fish food.
We can leave it at that for now.

Great advice! Never heard about the one fish idea. But it makes biological and biochemical sense (coming from a pharmacology graduate) haha!
 

slin1977

Member
Jul 13, 2011
3,476
1,661
Sydney
Great advice! Never heard about the one fish idea. But it makes biological and biochemical sense (coming from a pharmacology graduate) haha!
Last time I had ICH in my house / tank was 6 years ago.
Was devastating for me. An experience you can't afford to have with corals in your tank.
 

ReeferRob

Solidarit├ę
Oct 22, 2014
2,661
931
Bel Air
Go slow, add a fish, blennies are a good starter fish too and they'll graze on the inevitable diatom bloom. I like to add clowns , then a week later their anemone. I know I'll catch hell for this, but I don't believe the whole ZOMG YOU MUST WAIT A YEAR TO ADD AN ANEMONE crap. If you're tank is stable, a bubble tip is a great starter anemone that's damn near indestructible. Ritteris are the polar opposite and should only be attempted after you've gained knowledge. Soft corals tend to be more forgiving than are hard corals.